Architecture // Design

SFMOMA Re-Imagined

Founded in 1935, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art has a long, rich story. As the first West Coast museum dedicated to modern and contemporary art, SFMOMA expanded in 1970-1972 before moving in 1995—in celebration of its 60th anniversary—into a building especially designed to host its collection by Mario Botta. Closed to the public for massive expansion construction in 2013, SFMOMA reopened three years later with a 10-story addition designed by Snøhetta.

With nearly triple the exhibition space, the beautifully transformed SFMOMA now offers 170,000 square feet of galleries, and is the largest modern and contemporary art museum in the country. Inspired by the San Francisco Bay—its surrounding waters and foggy weather in particular—the eastern facade comprises more than 700 fiberglass reinforced polymer panels affixed to a curtain-wall system, creating a horizontal undulation and changing its appearance depending on the light.

The Snøhetta architecture not only looks to the future but also complements the original building, connecting to it by way of a sculptural staircase. On the third floor, the vertical garden—with over 19,000 plants, including 24 native species, all maintained with recycled water—is a true work of art. One of the many terraces offers stunning views of San Francisco, integrating the museum into the urban landscape and highlighting its relationship with the city.

 

Today, SFMOMA’s collection comprises over 47,000 artworks by masters such as Alexander Calder, Frida Kahlo, Jackson Pollock, Gerhard Richter and Cindy Sherman, among others. Furniture, product and graphic design, architecture, video, film, paintings, sculptures, works on paper and live performances can all be discovered in the museum.

At the same time as its 2016 reopening, SFMOMA launched the new Pritzker Center for Photography, a 15,000-square-foot gallery that is the largest space in any U.S art museum permanently devoted to photography.

 

From May 19-Sept. 2—Andy Warhol – From A to B and Back Again—the first retrospective of the artist organized in the U.S. since 1989—will feature more than 300 works of art that were first on display at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Opening May 23, JR: The Chronicles of San Francisco will present the outcome of a project led by internationally acclaimed artist JR who, during two months in early 2018, filmed, photographed and interviewed over 1,200 people from different communities all over the city.

And this October to February 2020, Soft Power will showcase new works and commissions by 20 artists from around the world who understand themselves as social actors. Better connected to the city, the welcoming, expanded building by Snøhetta provides a new experience. “No longer an inward looking shrine to the art object, a museum today must engage with its local conditions and communities in a proactive way,” the architects say. sfmoma.org

 

PHOTOGRAPHS: (CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT) BY HENRIK KAM, IWAN BAAN AND MATTHEW MILLMAN, COURTESY OF MOMA

A Refreshed Pat Killen Home In Manhattan Beach

When a starkly geometric home appeared on 10th Street in Manhattan Beach in the mid-1990s, it was a bright, rare flash of Modernism in a town flush with tile-roof Mediterraneans and quaint beach bungalows. The home had been designed by none other than architect Pat Killen, one of a small group of local architects who were applying Modernist principles to beachside homes decades before others would follow suit—and with superb results. 

Since then, the home has remained a classic California Modernist beach structure, complete with a dramatic juxtaposition of angles and curves, plenty of glass and one of Killen’s trademark’s—a touch of eclecticism. Its eye-catching looks aside, the home’s design was rooted in pragmatism, for Killen always insisted on capturing the best views and light, and chose Modernism as the way to get the job done.

After several owners, in 2014 the home came into the possession of homeowners who knew great architecture, and saw that Killen’s design, after so many years, could do with a refresh. “I was respectful of Pat’s work,” says one of the homeowners, a client of real estate agent Beth Morrissey.

Morrissey reached out to Pat Killen, who recommended Daryl Olesinski, a former associate at his firm Studio 9one2. Olesinski, along with fellow designer Martina Linden (their firm is O+ L Building Projects), made changes that would smartly enhance the original home. “Having worked for Pat Killen for a few years,” says Olesinski, “I knew Pat very well, and respect his position in the architecture of the South Bay.”

“Clearly this house had a great pedigree and a strong sense of line and massing,” Olesinski explains. “With that said, the current owners wanted a bit more from the house, and wanted to use the building in a different manner than the original design allowed for.” Included among Olesinski and Linden’s work was the installation of pocket doors to further mesh indoors and out.

Modernizing the fireplace. A portion of the ceiling was raised so that it followed the curve of the roofline. The beige exterior was updated to a soft gray, and the yard was dramatically overhauled. More changes were made and in the end, says Morrissey, who witnessed the before and after, the house had morphed into an updated version of a classic work of beach architecture.

“Daryl wanted to keep the remodel aligned with Pat’s original vision,” says Tyler Krikorian, general contractor for the project, whose specialty is high-end custom homes. “I followed his lead with everything, and I feel it was executed very nicely.”

When one walks into the glass-front foyer, one enters a meditative and sunlit space that feels not unlike a gallery. The curving staircase, a Killen trademark, is a focus point.

Approaching the second floor, one is treated to sweeping ocean views—a panorama that’s uplifting at first sight. “I remember very intense days at work,” says the homeowner. “I would come home and sit on one of the terraces and disconnect. Look at the ocean and reflect on life. It’s an incredible place.”

Spanning five bedrooms and approximately 4,300 square feet, the home embodies a central Killen design principle: “The way we live, with our contemporary lifestyle, people want open spaces, and they want it all to flow together,” he said in a 2010 video.

“But yet, you don’t want it to seem like it’s just one big auditorium, so there has to be personality that’s developed in those different spaces.” The home’s revisions were built upon this theme. Floor-to-window sliding glass was added to the living room so it conjoins the Brazilian ipe deck.

The result is a flurry of fresh air and sunlight added to this central open level, which includes a peaceful reading room along with a newly revamped kitchen and a breakfast nook. The formal dining room, with fresh floors of Brazilian cherry, expands to include a fresh-air sitting deck. “They expanded the upstairs view so you have 180-degree views of the ocean,” notes Morrissey, “That’s really hard to find in Manhattan Beach.”

The home’s yard, previously overlooked, was overhauled to offer outdoor living spaces that are bright lights in the memories of the homeowners. “On summer days, it’s one of the most refreshing places,” says the homeowner of the hearty ipe deck, home to a bubbling spa and an outdoor kitchen with a sleek barbecue and wine cooler.

There is a cozy side yard as well, a private, manicured green space where lights twinkle in the trees. “There’s a timeless element of the home’s design,” says Morrissey of the residence, which she remembers Pat Killen speaking fondly of, and referring to as a favorite project. “With the updating done—it’s truly a stunning property.”

The views and the architectural pedigree are fine points of the home, Morrissey points out, along with the open floor plan. The walkability to both town and beach is another. Morrissey, who’s been in local real estate for 16 years and raised her family in Manhattan Beach, cites it as an increasingly attractive lifestyle bonus.

After all, with downtown less than 10 minutes by foot, and the sand seven blocks from the home, it’s easy to conjure up visions of sunset swims, or walking to town for dinner—then coming home to a place that was designed around the pleasures of its climate and location. “This home is a piece of history when it comes to architecture in our community,” she says. “It’s a great example of Pat Killen’s work.”

PRESENTED BY

Beth Morrissey,
RE/MAX Estate Properties

310.977.2475

List Price
$5,199,000

 

Modern Aesthetic Of Tadao Ando

In 1929, construction commenced on a four-story apartment building at 659 West Wrightwood Avenue in Chicago’s Lincoln Park neighborhood. But one could argue that it would not realize its full potential until 2018, when it opened as the rechristened contemporary exhibition space Wrightwood 659, a stunning reconfiguration of its former self, by Osaka-based architect Tadao Ando.

The bones of the building fit beautifully with the splendid brick-row houses and tidy tree-lined streets of Lincoln Park, an area that supports Chicago as one of the most storied cities in America, its skyline and suburbs drawn by the likes of architectural giants Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright.

But to gaze inside Wrightwood 659—its quiet calculations of space and volume, its honest palette of materials, its respectful treatment of the existing architecture—is to think only of Ando, who is celebrated for “creating spaces of exceptional serenity and great beauty,” says Lisa Cavanaugh, director of Wrightwood 659.

“He is also known for creating art spaces that inspire viewers to take the time to reflect on what they are seeing. In all of his art spaces, the art is allowed to speak for itself and viewers are able to experience it in their own way.”

The finished space reflects what its founders, Lincoln Park residents Fred Eychaner and Dan Whittaker, envisioned—a site for exhibitions devoted to architecture, in itself a civic practice, and socially responsive art.

“They very much wanted an architecture that would not compete with the artworks, but, rather, would provide an environment that is conducive to looking and thinking,” explains Cavanaugh.

Thought permeates the place, its recreation one of the more brilliant mergers of art and architecture in recent memory. “This is clear when one enters what appears to be a traditional building with a neo-Georgian façade, only to encounter a soaring atrium with a grand staircase,” says Cavanaugh, adding that this “luminous, expansive space that extends to all four floors is at once peaceful and awe-inspiring.”

Wrightwood 659, Location: Chicago, Illinois, Architect: Tadao Ando

It also expresses an honesty that, while pure, has a kind of suspended beauty—it hits hard, but not all at once, and more gracefully than one might imagine from its materiality: brick from the existing building, granite floors, aluminum window frames. Wood-beamed ceilings warm the space, which is a showcase for Ando’s floating stairs, smooth concrete forms and poetic use of natural light.

 

THE INTERIOR OF AN OLD APARTMENT BUILDING, WRIGHTWOOD 659 WAS REIMAGINED BY JAPANESE ARCHITECT TADAO ANDO, WHO APPROACHED THE PROJECT WITH MINIMALIST PRINCIPLES TO CREATE AN OPEN, EXPANSIVE ENVIRONMENT THAT ALLOWS FOR THE CONTEMPLATION OF ARTWORK. ANDO’S SIGNATURE USE OF CONCRETE MIXED WITH BRICK AND WARM WOOD ADD TEXTURE AND RICHNESS TO THE SPACE WITH THE NATURAL WORLD JUST BEYOND

 

That Wrightwood 659 exudes a beautiful simplicity results from what is in reality a complex architectural calculus. The structure’s historic edifice was preserved to blend with the local vicinity, and the entire interior was gutted and rebuilt to create a canvas of 30,115 square feet and four stories. And yet in this monumentality is an intimate, quiet feeling, the haiku effect often prescribed to Ando.

Wrightwood 659 is not an Ando anomaly; he is known for his successful conversions of existing architecture, like the Palazzo Grassi in Venice, Italy. “When Ando encounters an existing building, he designs around it or within it, but never takes away from the original,” says Cavanaugh.

“He once explained that, ‘You should respect old people, you should respect old buildings.’” While Wrightwood 659 is set inside an older building, it is a bridge into a future world.

wrightwood659.org

 

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF JEFF GOLDBERG/ESTO

Roman and Williams In New York City

Since 2002, Robin Standefer and Stephen Alesch, the duo behind Roman and Williams, have designed restaurants, hotels, shops and furniture all over the country. At the end of 2017, they took a new step with the launch of their flagship store.

Located in SoHo, Roman and Williams Guild New York is spread over 7,000 square feet and home to a furniture store, a flower boutique, a cafe and a library. “We view the Guild as part of our home, and we made it the way we like things to be,” Standefer and Alesch say. “The Guild is a democratic sanctuary, which celebrates quality and the creative daring of craftspeople and artists.”

On display are glassware, ceramics, sculpture, lighting fixtures, home accessories and furniture pieces—comprising the original collection designed by Roman and Williams—plus objects collected from around the world.

For textiles, Standefer and Alesch collaborated with two legendary companies: Fortuny in Italy, and de Le Cuona in England. The space also hosts La Mercerie, a 44-seat French cafe helmed by chef Marie-Aude Rose and decorated with pale-gray floors, an indigo enameled kitchen and touches of blue. Botanical expert Emily Thompson, meanwhile, manages the flower boutique and the library.

 

In this eclectic place, the atmosphere stirs a feeling of being at home while every detail awakens the imagination and senses. “We built the Guild because we had a dream we wanted to share and a place where we wanted to be,” confess Standefer and Alesch.

rwguild.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF ROMAN AND WILLIAMS

 

Location:
SoHo, New York

Firm:
Roman and Williams

rwguild.com

 

The New Work Project

Today, the number of people who work remotely and independently is increasing. For this type of worker, traditional offices won’t do. New spaces—more flexible and collaborative—are burgeoning, aiming to build communities in an environment that facilitates productivity and fosters inspiration, boosts creativity, and encourages the exchange of ideas and experiences.

Nestled in a historic building that formerly housed Vice Media in Williamsburg—Brooklyn’s cultural hub with shops, cafes and restaurants within reach—The New Work Project reflects this growing trend.

Created by The New Design Project, helmed by Fanny Abbes and James Davison, this co-working space opened its doors in August 2017. Members are drawn from a range of creative industries including advertising, PR and marketing, architecture and design, TV, film and media, fashion and publishing.

 

LOCATED IN WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN, DESIGN-LED COWORKING SPACE THE NEW WORK PROJECT IS NESTLED IN A CONVERTED FOUNDRY. DEDICATED TO CREATORS AND INNOVATORS, IT WAS SHAPED BY THE NEW DESIGN PROJECT.

 

The atmosphere reflects this creative clientele. Adorned in black-and-white with brass detailing, the different refined areas consist of workstations, conference rooms, lounges, gallery desks and private studios. Midcentury furniture and elegant lighting fixtures combine with custom pieces by The New Design Project and others created in collaboration with local designers such as J.M. Szymanski and textile company Eskayel.

“Brooklyn is now recognized as a thriving hub of creativity and entrepreneurship,” says Davison. “The New Work Project is an intimate, one-of-a-kind, design-led workspace for individually minded creators and innovators.”

thenewworkproject.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF WILL ELLIS

 

Location:
Williamsburg, New York

Firm:
The New Design Project
thenewdesignproject.com

Gensler Urban-Creative Operation

It’s an interesting question, what an international, award-winning architecture, design and planning firm might create if designing a space for itself. For Gensler, the answer is this model of future-design in DTLA.

Even by the standards of Gensler, a giant with 48 locations throughout the globe, this project stands as an achievement, “the first vertical urban creative campus in the Downtown area,” touts the company. The South Figueroa St., LEED Platinum, block-long site—once headquarters of a bank from 1972—consists of a “three-level atrium building connected via a custom-designed bridge to an adjacent tower.”

 

HITS OF VIBRANT RED ARE USED JUDICIOUSLY THROUGHOUT THE WORK-SCAPE; THE SPACE IS OPEN AND VERTICALLY STACKED; NATURAL LIGHT WARMS COMMUNAL SPACES WITHIN THE BUILDING, WHICH FOSTERS CAMARADERIE BETWEEN CREATIVES.

 

Bigger picture is Gensler’s goal to manifest a 45,000-square-foot physical expression of what it might create for other creative business, while also serving as a laboratory for the company’s interdisciplinary team, one conceptualized as holistic with flexible, vertically stacked workspaces and a model shop, along with lifestyle-inspired areas that make an architect, designer or planner want to stay put—wellness rooms, an outdoor meeting patio, and a family room with coffee bar, among them.

The streamlined and well-spaced work-scape is also strikingly vibrant, with judicious hits of red throughout. Its unexpected orientation and aesthetically electric vibe give Gensler exactly what it wants to gain in the creative space—an edge.

gensler.com

 

PHOTOGRAPHS: GENSLER/RYAN GOBUTY

Location: 
Downtown L.A.

Firm: 
Gensler

gensler.com

 

 

A Thoughtfully Conceived Crossing By The Bay

In San Francisco, Twitter employees are enjoying a smooth commute. The company’s skybridge, a floating glass span 100 feet above a pedestrian alley in the city’s Mid-Market district, has eased the flow of traffic considerably.

That there is flow at all is a credit to architecture firm Bohlin Cynwinski Jackson, which conceptualized the skybridge to connect an Art Deco building and its adjacent annex. At just 35 feet in length, the solution is somewhat misleading—this is no small project. In fact, the skybridge creates “100,000-square-feet of contiguous office space on a single floor” that provides “opportunities for employee interaction and fosters a greater sense of community within the company,” according to BCJ.

THE TWITTER SKYBRIDGE BY BOHLIN CYNWINSKI JACKSON IS A FORWARD-THINKING ARCHITECTURAL SOLUTION CONCEIVED TO CREATE CONTIGUOUS SPACE BETWEEN BUILDINGS.

There’s the wider civic engagement as well; the transparent skybridge is a point of observation for multiple parties and draws its sense of lightness from tiled glass that reflects daytime shifts of sky and the soft illumination of evening. To reconcile the 5-foot difference in ninth-floor elevations of both buildings, BCJ sloped the skybridge downward, while extending its roofline upward, to link to the 10th-floor overlook.

Beyond boasting an astute architectural strategy on the part of BCJ, the skybridge is simply an arresting edifice to behold—a passageway that plays right into San Francisco’s progressive mood.

bcj.com

 

PHOTOGRAPHS: NIC LEHOUX, COURTESY OF BOHLIN CYNWINSKI JACKSON

 

Location:
San Francisco, California

Firm:
Bohlin Cynwinski Jackson
bcj.com

The Vessel: A Large-Scale Expression

For London-based Heatherwick Studio, designing the centerpiece of Hudson Yards—one of the largest real estate developments in America that has transformed a former rail yard in Manhattan’s Upper West Side—presented the opportunity to create a large-scale expression of the human experience.

 

THE VESSEL, A SCULPTURE IN THE HEART OF HUDSON YARDS, WAS CONCEIVED AS AN INFRASTRUCTURE TO FOSTER AND SUPPORT SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT VIA A SERIES OF STAIRS AND PLATFORMS. ITS BROADER MISSION MAKES IT A FORM FOR THE FUTURE

 

Soaring an astounding 16 stories and boasting a beehive-like design, the company’s Vessel might have been a bit of a Trojan horse were it not so thoughtfully conceived. What looks like a transplant from the future in fact nods to places of congregation in cities across the New World and Old, including Rome, where the Spanish Steps served as a point of reference for the sculpture, as did traditional Indian stepwells.

As an interactive art piece in the 21st century, however, the Vessel takes shape as an entirely new public offering: a circular, bronzed-steel and concrete climbing frame with a labyrinth of staircases and viewing platforms fostering engagement between social and physical environments.

According to Heatherwick, the company tapered the parameters of the project, intending it to be “a memorable single object” rather than a dispersion of objects throughout the space. So what might have been an “inert, static sculpture” is instead infrastructure designed to stimulate “activity and participation” among users.

heatherwick.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF HEATHERWICK STUDIO

 

Location:
Manhattan, New York

Firm :
Heatherwick Studio

heatherwick.com

A Miami Family Home Functioning As One

In Miami’s historic Collins Waterfront Architectural District, this house invites lush landscape and water views in, thanks to its designer, South Africa-based architecture studio SAOTA. The property honors the sunny and warm weather of Florida through several courtyards that outline the seamless relationship between interior and exterior.

 

“The design is as much about containment as it is about the views through the many living spaces toward the Atlantic Ocean and world-renowned Miami Beach,” says Philip Olmesdahl, director at SAOTA.

“While the overall contemporary architectural design is a key focus of the SAOTA design team, the use and connectivity of the spaces is the primary driver—how the house lives.” The double-volume entrance leads to the bright and airy open-concept main living area, which comprises the dining room and living room.

This space then opens up to an extensive terrace with a pool. The white walls and warm color palette highlight the beauty of the surrounding natural landscape. In collaboration with SAOTA, Nils Sanderson led the interior design, while Lux Populi was charged with lighting design and Raymond Jungles designed the landscaping.

The main bedroom offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean while five additional bedrooms allow the owners to host family and friends, welcoming them to indulge Miami’s relaxed lifestyle and atmosphere in a serene and sophisticated environment.

ACCORDING TO SAOTA DIRECTOR MARK BULLIVANT, “TIME WAS SPENT UNDERSTANDING THE USE OF THE SPACES, INCLUDING THE POOL COURTYARD”. DESIGNED BY SAOTA, THE BUILDING WAS CREATED AS A SELF-CONTAINED, MULTI-LAYERED LANDSCAPE OF EXPERIENCES. THE HOUSE OFFERS VIEWS OF THE INDIA CREEK CANAL TOWARDS THE ATLANTIC OCEAN. IN THE REFINED INTERIOR SPACES, WARM TONES PREVAIL.

saota.com

 

Location:
Miami, Florida

Firm:
SAOTA
saota.com

 

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF DAN FORER

90210 Trophy Property

Numerous factors converge to make this European-style estate the crown jewel of the Beverly Hills Flats: Think an outstanding realization of concept and design, complete with awe-inspiring interiors, breathtaking grounds punctuated by olive trees, lavender and Old-World gardens, and unrivaled views of the Los Angeles Country Club and Century City amid a peaceful and private setting.

“This home is on arguably the best street in Beverly Hills and the Flats, and one of only eight homes on the L.A. Country Club golf course,” says Jon Grauman, who is co-listing the residence at 837 Greenway Drive with Mauricio Umansky, both of The Agency, for $33 million. “It also has the widest frontage of any home in the Beverly Hills Flats.”

Set behind gates on almost an acre of flat land that opens up to the 9th green of the golf course, the seven-bedroom abode features more than 10,000 square feet of contemporary, Erinn Valencich-designed living space on two levels, replete with mid-century-style touches, from suede and chrome doors to high-gloss, wood grain cabinetry.

Among the highlights: a marble foyer with a striking, sculptural staircase that leads to a light-filled living room with wide-plank hardwood flooring, fashionable LED-lit ceiling, fireplace, white marble bar, and steel-and-glass French doors that open to reveal a loggia and gardens boasting water and fire features.

Yet other refinements include a formal dining room with a glass-enclosed, temperature-controlled wine room; chef’s kitchen sporting a spacious marble island and Miele appliances; circular master retreat featuring dual marble baths and custom showroom closets; a billiards room with fireplace; plush theater; and auto gallery.

Finally is a guesthouse and lushly landscaped, made-to-entertain grounds featuring a floating, infinity-edge pool, spa, fire pit and cabana with outdoor kitchen. The end result? Eye-catching charisma and a sublime perspective on Southern California living in one of the country’s most prestigious ZIP codes.

 

PRESENTED BY

Jon Grauman and  Mauricio Umansky of The Agency

424.238.2484

List Price
$33 million

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF THE AGENCY

Hotel-Like Estate By The Sea

World-famous architect Tony Ashai has a distinct design philosophy, one that is steadfast to all things classic and timeless. That is to build a client’s dream home tailored to their individual lifestyle, and in a way that never goes out of style. For the property at 67 Paseo Del La Luz, Aisha—working with general contractor Josh Herbst, who is well-known for building premium homes in Beverly Hills—applied his classical stance and commitment to visual balance to create this elegant retreat reminiscent of a luxury seaside European villa.

Commanding views from a secluded neighborhood in Rancho Palos Verdes, this particular home is one of the newest properties built in the Oceanfront Estates community. Here, gorgeous private estates are surrounded by large manicured lawns with deep setbacks and wide streets. The slight gradation of land allows one to truly enjoy the cliffside locale and still enjoy 180-degree ocean vistas. With this neighborhood also near to some of the town’s hotspots like Terranea Resort and Trump International Golf Course, dining out or playing a round of golf is the norm.

The beautiful limestone colonnades at the entry create an almost piazza feel with cloistered ceilings along the hallways that are perfectly symmetrical, true to Ashia’s philosophy. Along with this visual balance, the grand, almost palatial, spaces feel surprisingly intimate and comforting. “The entrance to this home and its common areas feel like the lobby of a five- or six-star hotel in Europe,” describes Lily Liang, Realtor for Strand Hill Christie’s International Real Estate Group.

The attention to detail is unmatched, evident not only in the classic European wrought iron that wraps the dramatic and curved dual-sided staircase but in the individually carved marble stairs and floors that run throughout the common areas and hallways too. Hardwood floors, meanwhile, warm the bedrooms. “Those with a keen eye and understanding for architecture can see the value in the curved lines of the marble stairs and the authenticity of the colonnade pillars and fireplaces being hand-carved from French limestone,” adds Liang. Clearly, no expense was spared for the sake of quality and pure form.

Boasting just over 8,300 square feet, the tremendous volume of the space is highlighted by dramatic coffered ceilings that vary from room to room with clean lines so as to not feel overdone. Spaces seamlessly blend due to a flowing floor plan and creamy monochromatic color palette that yields a streamlined yet intricate aesthetic. One always finds delightful surprises in a home like this one: a regal study, custom wine cellar built directly into the dual staircase, and posh home theater, along with dedicated space for a gym or reading room.

All of these unique spaces are only steps away from outside access through a multitude of arched French doors leading to lovely grounds. The ultimate feature for the gourmet cook is the home’s second kitchen, sometimes known as a kosher kitchen, where a self-proclaimed chef can engage in the messier side of cooking, discreetly and out of the way of the main kitchen. Anchored by a huge slab of cream marble on the island and furniture-style cabinetry, this space also is appointed with a six-burner Wolf range, including griddle, indoor grill, and a professional grade ventilation system, tucked under a classic French-style hood.

Meanwhile, refined wooden panels mask doubled-sided Sub-Zero refrigerators, as well as dual dishwashers and other storage. This home was definitely built for a family or an owner who enjoys throwing a good party too; there’s a multitude of entertaining space, including two grand living rooms, one at the entry and the other downstairs with pool access, as well as a more intimate family room. Adjacent to the family room is a classic full-size wet bar with counter seating for enjoying a cognac after a dinner party in the formal dining room. Both upstairs and downstairs entertaining areas open up to gorgeous scenes from various balconies and patios.

The lavish master suite is one of the four bedrooms. Bordered by two balconies—west and southwest facing—one may enjoy vistas to Catalina right from bed. In the master and throughout the balance of the bedrooms, finely crafted built-ins with trim details create ample storage, as well. A swoon-worthy closet fit for a king and a massive master bath with a silver-tipped clawfoot tub complete the master suite. The balance of the bedroom-suites are very generous in size, each with a full bath and closets with built-ins. Each of the six baths, which include two powder rooms, one with a richly-done chrome sink, are individually designed with fresco-style tilework, furniture-like vanities and unique features.

A unique advantage to this home is that has two separate backyards. Perfect for families with small children, and completely gated, there is a large grassy lawn for playing sports or housing a pet on one side, and meticulous landscapes wrapping the lovely pool, with waterfall feature, and the spa on the other. Here, plenty of outdoor seating is available on the covered patio draped by colonnade-style pillars, as well as in the outdoor kitchen area with built-in barbecue grill. Sitting on just over a half-acre of land, the home’s exterior offers abundant grassy space for kids to run and play.

The property’s outdoor environment paints a transcendent classical picture via its dramatic colonnades, pillars of limestone, wrought iron-wrapped balconies, and smooth stone finish. Combined with its exquisite interior, this home translates to a life spent on permanent vacation in a seaside villa where stunning views and privacy abound—beautifully.

 

PRESENTED BY
Lily Liang
Strand Hill Properties
Christie’s International Real Estate

310.902.7799

List Price
$6,789,000

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PAUL JONASON

The Commodore of Hollywood

Seeing itself as a custodian of historic residential buildings, Wilshire Skyline has had its eye on a one-of-a-kind, historic landmarked property in the heart of Hollywood for quite some time—a Mediterranean Revival-style apartment-hotel known as The Commodore that was developed in 1927 by contractor Samuel F. Bard & Co. and architectural designer Lewis A. Smith.

Fast-forward to today, and the L.A.-based real estate management and development company have dedicated approximately $10 million to transform the notable structure into The Commodore of Hollywood by Wilshire Skyline, complete with residential and hotel-style accommodations boasting modern luxuries and top-of-the-line amenities geared toward renters and travelers alike.

“Our renovation seeks to revive the building’s old Hollywood beauty and truly pay homage to the era in which it was constructed,” says Alan Nissel, principal of Wilshire Skyline. “By breathing new life into the building, we are offering residents and guests a truly special opportunity to experience old Hollywood luxury priced within reach. Our standout offerings, matched with the building’s prime location, are ideal for creatives and professionals who yearn to live like a local and have easy access to every L.A. urban expectation.”

Situated at 1830 N Cherokee Ave.—within walking distance to Vine Street, Hollywood Boulevard, Musso & Frank Grill, Grauman’s Chinese Theater and Runyon Canyon—the Killefer Flammang Architects and Studio Preveza-designed building is expected to be completed by mid-April. Expect some of the most outstanding details to be preserved (“to give it a sense of being a time capsule,” says Nissel), including an ornate entry portico, molding, arched openings, a decorative stone fireplace, and terrazzo flooring.

Accommodations will include 73 pet-friendly residences and nine hotel-style units ranging from 350 to 810 square feet, and featuring abundant natural light, soaring ceilings, hardwood flooring, spacious walk-in closets, and eat-in kitchens.

The studio and one-bedroom residences will be available furnished or unfurnished, with prices ranging from $2,000 to $5,000 per month and guest suites available for a nightly rate. Among the perks: free Wi-Fi, housekeeping, 24/7 concierge services, secured parking, a private dog park and state-of-the-art wellness workout center with Peloton bikes and virtual trainers. commodorehollywood.com

 

 

PHOTOGRAPH: COURTESY OF JESÚS BAÑUELOS

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